Growing Up Crescent

Growing Up Crescent – While at ‪#‎garden2grow‬ ‪#‎mossmountainfarm‬ with P. Allen Smith 25 social media influencers took a few minutes to learn about Crescent Garden planters and the history behind them from Crescent’s owner Paula Douer. They then were able to go back in time and pretend to be 7 year olds to compete in creating miniature gardens in a Crescent Garden Juno planter. The result was lots of laughter and a little bit magical.
Growing Up Crescent Video


Miniature garden furniture came from Fairy Homes and Gardenshttp://www.fairyhomesandgardens.com, potting soil was provided by Good Dirthttps://www.facebook.com/GoodDirt/, plants are Proven Winners plants https://www.provenwinners.com, those fabulous planters are from Crescent Garden http://www.crescentgarden.com, and the vibrant personalities of the folks pictured are all their own.

Social influencers pictured:



Michelle Slatalla

Jason Ambrosino

Brittany May

Penny Ausley

Rachael Brugger

Jennifer Burke

Melissa Caughey

David Ellis

Sara Gasbara

Daniel Bear Hunley

Amy Renea Kauffman

Luke & Sindy Marion

Nick & Allison McCullough

Russell McLendon

Tara Nolan

Gary Pilarchik

Jennifer Prock 

Stephanie Rose 

Nancy Wallace 

Max Wastler

Kristy Wicks 

Monica Willis

Brett Youmans


Why I Let Myself Go To Pot

It actually started as something akin to love at first sight. 


There I was mid-May of 2015, blithely working the manic world of a landscaper, juggling 350+ clients, 7 company branches, 5 subcontractors simultaneously as twice a year we changed out seasonal flower beds within a 6-8 week period. In-between those install times was the maintenance, schedule building, special projects, client meetings, ordering, plant disease issues, landscape designs, a few garden-related writing and speaking gigs, and every once in while I’d get to focus on what first directed me into this line of work – container gardening. 
In May of 2015 I took a few days to visit with some garden-writer friends at P. Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Farm. And that’s when I saw them – the garden planters, the decorative pots, that were the culmination of all that I’d been looking for as a gardener and as a landscaper. Yep, kind of melodramatic, I know. But let me help you understand a little bit of why finding exceptional containers had such an impact on me. During a most of my landscaping career, I averaged putting together up to 1200 container plantings a year. Shoot, I even wrote a book about  container gardening! And I loved the challenge of creating a planter display that made my clients feel like their personality, preferences, and passion were reflected in those pots. 
But the job wasn’t always just about the planting. Sometimes I would have folks tell me they wanted a plant combo they’d seen in Southern Living magazine that included a 3 gallon rose and 6 different plants, and they wanted it planted in pots they found on sale at some designer store, they’d have no drainage hole, and would hold about one cup of potting soil. Then there would be the install issues of the client who’d ordered those gorgeous antique-looking 350 pound cast stone or clay planters that they wanted on the back porch which could only be accessed by going up 3 flight of stairs. Folks, I’m not making this up! 
So, back to that love at first sight, I’ve found the containers of my dreams scenario: as I wandered around P. Allen Smith farm, I kept seeing these beautiful planters. Yes, the flowers in them were very pretty, but the planters themselves were unique and absorbed my attention. A couple of the planters I had to thunk with my fingers because I didn’t believe they were actually made of resin as I had been told. 
I started quizzing my garden friends, “Who made these planters?” 
Then I started learning more about them: 
*many of the styles are double walled to protect the plant roots against heat or freezing. I have been advocating for years that with iron, stone, or glazed clay that absorb so much heat or cold, it is important to create some type of layer (pot within a pot) to protect plant roots from extreme temperature.
*they had a ten year warranty against fading or cracking. 
*even the larger planters were manageable for the average gardener
*the taller planters have a “gravity cavity” that can be filled with sand to stabilize them in windy conditions. 
*and then there is the story of the young Miami couple (the owners of the company) with a dream of selling pots that were attractive and affordable and met the needs of gardeners and landscapers, who loaded up their van and went from nursery to nursery. Learning as they went along from the feedback of those they met to create an even better container. 
*Crescent Garden teaming with Four Star Nursery, an industry leader in growing ornamental plants, and testing for 3 years to create a “self-watering” planter – the TruDot Self-watering system with Patent Pending Water Level Indicator. I’ve tried my hand at many a self-watering planter and this one finally gets it right. 
Over the next few months after that first introduction to Crescent Garden planters, I realized that I’d actually been promoting these containers for years. If anyone has ever heard me speak, I have included for years the photos of planters I’ve seen along Michigan Ave in Chicago over the years, exhorting the virtues of adding large planters in streetscapes to enhance the beauty of a city. Guess whose planters those are? 
Crescent Garden’s 
So I introduced these planters to my co-workers and clients. Over a few months I chatted with Crescent about my writing a little for them and helping with their social media. Then when life pointed to making some changes in my life, I made the choice to let myself go to pot. Well, technically go to pots, but by leaving off the “s” it sounds so much more dramatic. I started my new career in sales and marketing with Crescent Garden. 
Now, in letting myself go to pot, my days are filled with helping landscapers and garden centers learn the benefits of these planters that adeptly address so many container gardening issues that stifle new gardeners, maintenance crews, and landscape installers. We even have a landscape direct program that allows landscaper to order planters directly to the install location, with set pricing that already includes shipping costs so no need to call around for freight costs. 

Yep, whatever I want to call it: Pot Peddler (that raises some eyebrows), Purveyor of pots, Pot Salesman (more raised eyebrows), Container Connoisseur, it’s a job I relish in as I just let myself go to pot. 

Post Script – About 10 years ago I started changing out the clay and stone planters at my own house to double-walled rotational molded planters like Crescent carries so that I could move them around on my own (my boys were going off to college/getting married and not there to help me) and I could keep them throughout the winter. It’s nice to now have an option for some better looking rotational molded planters here in Tennessee!

P. Allen Smith and the Garden2Blog Reunion 2015

This past week I spent a delightful few days with a very talented group of garden bloggers who were hosted by P. Allen Smith and some of his sponsors. This short video clip is a preview of pictures and stories to come once my planting season is over and I have more time to write! Thank-you, Allen and your warm and friendly staff, and to American Grown Flowers, Aromatique, Bonnie Plants, Crescent Gardens, Jobes Organics (Easy Gardener), First Nature, Flexzilla, Little Rock Visitor’s Bureau, Sakata Home Grown, Stargazer Barn,  and Trios Restaurant.

The Christmas Wreath That Keeps on Giving – Berry Family Nursery P Allen Smith Collection

 IF you look at my last post, which was waaayyy too long ago, I wrote about the beautiful P Allen Smith Collection fresh wreath that I recieved from Berry Family Nurseries. It’s been almost 2 months since I received this wreath and I still have it hanging on my door.

 I have NEVER have a fresh wreath last this long!! I’m think I might just put a pink ribbon on it and make it a Valentine’s wreath. It is still looking green and I’ve had no needle drop.

 So here’s my plug for ordering fresh greenery from Berry Family Nursery – top quality, extremely long lasting, and weeks after Christmas is still welcoming folks at my front door.

And since I didn’t get a chance to say it last month – Merry Christmas to all from my house to yours!!

Around The Gardening World – Day 69 (More on Thistle Farms)

My last post was about Madalene House and Thistle Farms. In this post I get to combine several of my favorite things – which includes Thistle Farms products, Christmas, P Allen Smith, and the Berry Family of Nurseries. Last week I received this beautiful wreath from the Berry Family of Nurseries’ Holiday collection from P Allen Smith.

 It was sent to me with the challenge of decorating it in a way that would bring to light one of my favorite charitable organizations. P Allen Smith will then post it on his Pinterest Page – if my post gets the most response from Allen’s page, then my organization will get a set of fresh greenery sent to them by the Berry Family! So here’s my dilemma – It is perfect on my front door and I love it JUST THE WAY IT WAS SENT TO ME. But I want folks to know about Thistle Farms and the Madalene House. 

Well, as it so happens I also am having some friends over soon for a little Christmas gathering. I had been trying to think of a fun way to hand out my little Christmas surprises that I had gotten for my friends – all goodies that I had purchased from Thistle Farms to support their organization, help my friends learn about their great products, and to just let my friends know I love ’em.
Here’s a little about this organization:

“Founded in 1997 by Becca Stevens, an Episcopal priest on Vanderbilt’s campus, Magdalene is a residential program for women who have survived lives of prostitution, trafficking, addiction and life on the streets.
Thistle Farms is our social enterprise.

A few highlights of the Magdalene program:

For two years, we offer housing, food, medical and dental needs, therapy, education and job training without charging the residents or receiving government funding.
Our six homes function without 24-hour live-in staff, relying on residents to create a supportive community, maintain recovery, and share household tasks.
Women come to Magdalene from prison, the streets and from across the Southeast and the country.
The women of Magdalene/Thistle Farms range in age from 20-50, and many have been sexually abused between the ages of 7-11, began using alcohol or drugs by 13, have been arrested on average a hundred times, or have spent about 12 years on the street prostituting.
72% percent of the women who join Magdalene are clean and sober 2 1/2 years after beginning the program.
We furnish housing for 30 residents and graduates and provide outreach services to women still living on the streets. New residents are given a key and are offered the necessary resources to maintain recovery, heal from childhood wounds, become physically healthy and find employment.
After four months, the women find work, return to school and/or enter Magdalene’s job training program at Thistle Farms, a social enterprise. Magdalene also offers a matched savings program to help residents prepare for economic independence upon graduation. Women who remain in recovery two years post-graduation are eligible for a new home buying program administered by two local congregations and Magdalene.
Magdalene’s programs are grounded in its 24 spiritual principles that advocate living gracefully in community with one another. Residents, graduates, staff and volunteers share daily tasks, offer hospitality, build on each other’s strengths, and provide compassionate, disciplined support.
Magdalene was founded not only to help a subculture of women, but also to help transform the culture itself. We stand in solidarity with women who are recovering from abuse, trafficking, addiction, and life on the streets, and who have paid dearly for a culture that continues to buy and sell women.
Magdalene stands as a witness to the truth that in the end, love is more powerful than all the forces that drive women to the streets.”

I decided to use the wreath as a centerpiece on my coffee table and decorate it with the different Thistle Farms products. As I pulled out my teacups for the party, I put a small sticky dot on the bottom of the cups with a number (from 1- 20). After we visit and enjoy catching up, I’ll have the gals check the bottom of their teacups. Number 1 gets to choose first from the wreath and we’ll go from there.

Some of the products that Thistle Farms creates are Healing Oils

Batic Hot Pads and Coasters, Holiday candles,

Cards made from real flowers, lotions and lip balm, and a travel survival kit.

Thank-you, P Allen Smith and Berry Family of Nurseries for this opportunity to get the word out about this organization that is changing my outlook on life as it dramatically changes the lives of so many other women. 

Around The Gardening World – Day 69 (More on Thistle Farms)

Batic Hot Pads and Coasters, Holiday candles,

My last post was about Madalene House and Thistle Farms. In this post I get to combine several of my favorite things – which includes Thistle Farms products, Christmas, P Allen Smith, and the Berry Family of Nurseries. Last week I received this beautiful wreath from the Berry Family of Nurseries’ Holiday collection from P Allen Smith.

 My buddy, P Allen Smith, has teamed up with the Berry Family of Nurseries to create some wonderfully enhanced and delightfully fresh greenery that comes ready to hang or set on your table or mantle.

 It was sent to me with the challenge of decorating it in a way that would bring to light one of my favorite charitable organizations. P Allen Smith will then post it on his Pinterest Page – if my post gets the most response from Allen’s page, then my organization will get a set of fresh greenery sent to them by the Berry Family! So here’s my dilemma – It is perfect on my front door and I love it JUST THE WAY IT WAS SENT TO ME. But I want folks to know about Thistle Farms and the Madalene House. I chose a wreath from the Holiday collection because when you 

 Well, as it so happens I also am having some friends over soon for a little Christmas gathering. I had been trying to think of a fun way to hand out my little Christmas surprises that I had gotten for my friends – all goodies that I had purchased from Thistle Farms to support their organization, help my friends learn about their great products, and to just let my friends know I love ’em.
Here’s a little about this organization:

“Founded in 1997 by Becca Stevens, an Episcopal priest on Vanderbilt’s campus, Magdalene is a residential program for women who have survived lives of prostitution, trafficking, addiction and life on the streets.
Thistle Farms is our social enterprise.
A few highlights of the Magdalene program:
For two years, we offer housing, food, medical and dental needs, therapy, education and job training without charging the residents or receiving government funding.
Our six homes function without 24-hour live-in staff, relying on residents to create a supportive community, maintain recovery, and share household tasks.
Women come to Magdalene from prison, the streets and from across the Southeast and the country.
The women of Magdalene/Thistle Farms range in age from 20-50, and many have been sexually abused between the ages of 7-11, began using alcohol or drugs by 13, have been arrested on average a hundred times, or have spent about 12 years on the street prostituting.
72% percent of the women who join Magdalene are clean and sober 2 1/2 years after beginning the program.
We furnish housing for 30 residents and graduates and provide outreach services to women still living on the streets. New residents are given a key and are offered the necessary resources to maintain recovery, heal from childhood wounds, become physically healthy and find employment.
After four months, the women find work, return to school and/or enter Magdalene’s job training program at Thistle Farms, a social enterprise. Magdalene also offers a matched savings program to help residents prepare for economic independence upon graduation. Women who remain in recovery two years post-graduation are eligible for a new home buying program administered by two local congregations and Magdalene.
Magdalene’s programs are grounded in its 24 spiritual principles that advocate living gracefully in community with one another. Residents, graduates, staff and volunteers share daily tasks, offer hospitality, build on each other’s strengths, and provide compassionate, disciplined support.
Magdalene was founded not only to help a subculture of women, but also to help transform the culture itself. We stand in solidarity with women who are recovering from abuse, trafficking, addiction, and life on the streets, and who have paid dearly for a culture that continues to buy and sell women.
Magdalene stands as a witness to the truth that in the end, love is more powerful than all the forces that drive women to the streets.”
Add caption

I decided to use the wreath as a centerpiece on my coffee table and decorate it with the different Thistle Farms products. As I pulled out my teacups for the party, I put a small sticky dot on the bottom of the cups with a number (from 1- 20). After we visit and enjoy catching up, I’ll have the gals check the bottom of their teacups. Number 1 gets to choose first from the wreath and we’ll go from there.

Some of the products that Thistle Farms creates are Healing Oils

Cards made from real flowers, lotions and lip balm, and a travel survival kit.

Thank-you, P Allen Smith and Berry Family of Nurseries for this opportunity to get the word out about this organization that is changing my outlook on life as it dramatically changes the lives of so many other women. 

The Bonding Attributes of Cooking With Le Creuset

What happens when you take a 19 year old son who loves to cook and is a vegetarian and mix that with a momma (who is a card-carrying carnivore) who is working 14-16 hour days for 9 weeks straight but has a brand new Le Creuset  French oven that is just begging to be used and needs to have a recipe tried out in so she can write a blog post about it?
Well, this is what I did: 

I wait until my visa doesn’t arrive in time for me to take a trip to China with my husband thus I finally have a few days at home for a staycation, it rains the entire time I am home, and I enlist the help of that son and proclaim, “Create a vegetarian dish that doesn’t make me think ‘I’m eating a vegetarian dish.'”

 So Buck creates a recipe that he wanted to call “Rat Lasagna” but I convinced him that would only be appetizing to an oddball few so he went with the more descriptive and appropriately named
                                                        Ratatouille Lasagna
1-2 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 eggplant
2 zucchini
3 yellow crooked-neck squash
1 Vidalia onion (chopped)
2 jars of Bertolli Organic Tomato and Basil sauce
24 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese
15 oz. shredded Parmesan cheese
1 12 oz. Ricotta Cheese
1 pkg. no cook Lasagna noodles
3 cloves garlic
10 fresh Basil leaves
2 tsp dried thyme
2 tsp McCormick’s Herbs de Providence
1 tsp sea salt (add salt to taste)
1 tsp pepper (add pepper to taste)
10 stalks of fresh asparagus

Pre-heat oven to 375 F.
Thinly slice the first five ingredients (easy to do with the Cutco knife seen in this picture)

 Mince garlic cloves and finely chop fresh basil. In a separate bowl mix jars of tomato sauce with basil, garlic, and remaining spices.

 Begin layering ingredients in Le Creuset starting with one-third of the tomato-herb mixture, then one-third of the pasta.

 Add one-third of the sliced vegetables (the chopped onions go on the second layer)

 Spread one-third of the Ricotta cheese over the vegetables, then sprinkle one-third mozzarella cheese and one-third of the parmesan over the Ricotta cheese. (you could mix these cheeses together beforehand but my son enjoys the creative process…).
Begin the second layer adding one-third of the tomato sauce, noodles, sliced veggies – this is where you also added the chopped onions- and the cheeses.
Repeat with the final layers. (My son also sprinkled a few of the spices on the top).
Cook uncovered for 40 minutes at 375 F. Lay asparagus across the top and cover for the remaining 15 minutes.

This is what you have left to clean up.

Hot out of the oven. 

The taste test by the cook 

Anticipation builds

he knows its a winner!

Not too sure about this vegetarian dish…

Magnifico! 

Thank-you, Le Creuset for a fabulous cooking utensil that cooks so evenly and is soooo easy to clean. And thank-you Buck Wise for taking me a giant step in craving good vegetarian dishes!

Here’s the recipe in easy copy and paste form: 

                                      Ratatouille Lasagna
1-2 red bell pepper
1 yellow bell pepper
1 eggplant
2 zucchini
3 yellow crooked-neck squash
1 Vidalia onion (chopped)
2 jars of Bertolli Organic Tomato and Basil sauce
24 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese
15 oz. shredded Parmesan cheese
1 12 oz. Ricotta Cheese
1 pkg. no cook Lasagna noodles
3 cloves garlic
10 fresh Basil leaves
2 tsp dried thyme
2 tsp McCormick’s Herbs de Providence
1 tsp sea salt (add salt to taste)
1 tsp pepper (add pepper to taste)
10 stalks of fresh asparagus
Pre-heat oven to 375 F.
Thinly slice the first five ingredients.
Mince garlic cloves and finely chop fresh basil. In a separate bowl mix jars of tomato sauce with basil, garlic, and remaining spices. Begin layering ingredients in Le Creuset starting with one-third of the tomato-herb mixture, then one-third of the pasta. Add one-third of the sliced vegetables (the chopped onions go on the second layer). Spread one-third of the Ricotta cheese over the vegetables, then sprinkle one-third mozzarella cheese and one-third of the parmesan over the Ricotta cheese. (you could mix these cheeses together beforehand).
Begin the second layer adding one-third of the tomato sauce, noodles, sliced veggies – this is where you also added the chopped onions- and the cheeses.
Repeat with the final layers. (sprinkled a few of the spices on the top).
Cook uncovered for 40 minutes at 375 F. Lay asparagus across the top and cover for the remaining 15 minutes of cooking.
Remove from oven and  let sit for 5 minutes before serving.
Serves 12.

P’s in a P.O.D. (Reflections on a visit with P. Allen Smith)

It is a Perfectly Outstanding Destination (P.O.D.)  This past May I was able to spend 2 full days in the company of P. Allen Smith and 21 garden bloggers that included fun visits at his garden home (in the historic area of downtown Little Rock) , his Moss Mountain Retreat in Roland, Arkansas, a tour and lunch at the governor’s mansion, and some wonderful activities where we learned about the products from some of the folks for whom Allen is a spokes-person.
Our visit began with a short ride to the Arkansas governor’s mansion, a place that Allen is very familiar with due to his years working there as a teenager. He has had input in designing and updating the grounds and gardens over the years and gave us a tour describing the changes. 

 The wisteria was in fragrant bloom along the trellises in the back courtyard,

as was the nepata (catmint). 

Rose experts Teresa Byington  and Chris VanCleave were able to offer input also as we toured the rose garden area of the mansion. 
Chris in his element! 

Garden Writer Christopher Tidrick was putting his photography skills to good use capturing the interesting garden art at the Governor’s mansion. 

Because of the late spring this year, the azaleas were still in full bloom around the mansion.

If you are around Allen for even a short amount of time, you’ll learn quickly about his love for and ease with animals.

The governor’s mansion has a fabulous working garden. 

 

 The courtyard athe governor’s mansion was cheerful and inviting!

I enjoyed lunch with Byron Ford, Mary Beth Burner Shaddix, Steve Asbell,  MaryAnn Newcomer, and Robin Ripley – who were all eager to tweet about the fabulous gardens we had just seen. 

Being with Allen and the garden bloggers was fabulous enough. Dining at the governor’s mansion with First Lady (and avid gardener) Ginger Beebe made the experience priceless!

Our next venture was to Allen’s Garden House in downtown historic Little Rock.  Garden writer and author Teresa O’Conner is soaking all the info in.

Here we were able to see how he made a small garden area transform into garden rooms that surrounded the home, intertwining his design experience in England with his love of creating a welcoming home environment from the moment you enter the white picket fence. I personally enjoyed checking out the plants he was trialling for Proven Winner Plants. 

On a side note, I really was diggin’ Laura Mathews groovy shoes 

Allen told me what this vine was but I can’t find my note where I wrote it down – anyone want to help me out with this? 

Even Allen’s potting shed had creative touches!

My friend and fellow container gardener Kerry Michael and I were inspired by Allen’s container plantings . 

And the Bonnie Plants’ garden is as pretty as it is practical! 

I wish my potting shed looked like this. 

Garden designer and author Jenny Peterson is grabbing a few shots of inspiration to remember when she heads back to Austin. and grabs a shot of me! 

At Moss Mountain Retreat, one of our favorite gathering places is under the giant oak tree – one of the “sisters” as Allen calls them. 

Camp director Mimi San Pedro keeps us all on track (when she’s not keeping us all giggling with her great stories). 

Time to catch up with garden friends – Jenny, Robin, MaryAnn, and Teresa.

Bear with me as we peek inside Allen’s home…

a view out the back from the screen porch

My favorite room in the house – the sleeping porch. 

the perfect bathtub for a sleeping porch.

I couldn’t bear the thought of leaving!!

This spot on the third floor “cousin’s” attic offered the best view of the river. 

The sparkling heads of Allium.

Did you know that Fritillaria is often planted to keep moles and voles away? 

and it looks pretty, too! 

Take a moment to enjoy the gardens surrounding Allen’s retreat home.

Mary Ann gets some hands on experience with Allen’s heritage chickens.   You can learn about chickens from Allen’s website or from his Poultry Workshop in September

How many barns do you know of that have gorgeous planters that flank their doorways like this one?

This home on the farm was a project that showed how to build an ecologically friendly home with economy in mind!

We were able to be a part of building a pond with Allen’s sponsor Laguna Ponds. 

The vegetable gardens were luscious and practical.

The rose garden was dreamy – thank you Star Roses! www.conard-pyle.com

The king and queen of roses 

 Allen and Berry Nursery’s Heidi Berry (www.berrynurseries.com) showed us some foot stompin’ good  dance moves in the barn after dinner!

And those adorable rain-boot-wearing gals, Carol and Kerrie, who started The Seed Keeper Company, are always ready enhance the party with more fun and laughter!! www.seedkeepercompany.com

Needless to say, you can understand now how a visit with all these People gathered with P Allen Smith made us all P’s in a P.erfectly O.utstanding D.estination.  One thing that these pictures only partially portray is the genuineness of this man and passion that flows from him for restoring and cultivating the agrarian society. To be so well connected, so well educated in many areas, to be so well recognized in the indoor and outdoor design world, Allen is at heart a farmer with a love for people, for history, and for improving the world around us for future generations.  Thank you, Allen, for allowing me to see a glimpse of the beauty you are bringing to the world and the beauty of who you are. 


Are You a Bulb-maniac?

Yesterday I was catching up with my friend, Bruce Bailey, who has a fabulous nursery in Washington state and a website call Heavy Petal Nursery, and we were talking about the upcoming gardening events that we look forward to. Two that should be on every gardener’s bucket list – as least those who have a passion for bulbs – is garden visit to P Allen Smith’s Moss Mountain Retreat during Daffodil Days and the Dallas Arboretum’s Dallas Blooms.
Moss Mountain Retreat: 
P Allen Smith Garden Home Retreat

Tulips and Daffodils line the walkways with color.

Enjoy a scrumptious lunch from Allen’s own recipes in this restored barn on your visit.

And sit a spell on the front porch to just enjoy the view.

Enjoy a walk through the woods to visit Allen’s farm animals.

Allen rode up to meet us at the house on his bicycle!

Feb. 22 – March 23 – Daffodil Days at Moss Mountain Retreat 

And the Dallas Arboretum:

March 2 – April 7 

The blooming forsythia, and other bushes, vines, and trees are a breathtaking display that frames the blooming fields of bulbs.

The container plantings were stunning and I loved the simplicity of this bowl of gerber daisies. 

The azaleas are worth the trip alone!

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A young Columar Sargent Cherry tree Prunus sargentii ‘Columnaris’

Workers keep the bulb beds looking tidy as new waves of bulbs bloom.